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Guest Message by DevFuse

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Water pump in the 2.7L & 3.0L engines


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4 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   1BlinkGone

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 03:30 AM

Doing some more research, I found that these engines have the water pump (internally) underneath the timing cover...not exactly the best place for access on replacement, & it's driven by the timing chain. As I understand it, it's at least a $1,800 job to have it done, and perhaps far more if they have to pull the engine for its replacement. (cringe)

 

Those of you with a good working history of these engines...what do you think is the typical lifespan of the waterpump, ie in a properly maintained cooling system such as this?  I definitely would have a proper garage or dealership with a quality shop replace it as my days of that stuff are well over... Thanks in advance. I'm chagrined about this revelation, but not enough to deflect my interest from the Continental.


Edited by 1BlinkGone, 02 May 2017 - 03:30 AM.


#2 OFFLINE   brucelinc

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 01:51 PM

Back when water pumps had a big fan attached to the shaft, they often failed as soon as 50,000 miles or so.  Since going to electric fans and with other improvements, they last a LOOOONG time.   I wouldn't even give it a thought until well over 100,000 miles.   


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#3 OFFLINE   1BlinkGone

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 06:49 PM

Back when water pumps had a big fan attached to the shaft, they often failed as soon as 50,000 miles or so.  Since going to electric fans and with other improvements, they last a LOOOONG time.   I wouldn't even give it a thought until well over 100,000 miles.   

 

Yep...@ about 50k look for traces (or more) of coolant around the weep hole for the seal being compromised...that's very encouraging to hear about the new water pumps, Brucelinc; and I figured you'd have the answer for that. Thank you very much!


Edited by 1BlinkGone, 02 May 2017 - 07:13 PM.


#4 OFFLINE   Town

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Posted 03 May 2017 - 12:37 AM

An internal coolant pump has been in production for a long time on many engines, Ford and GM and others. The failure rate is not high, but gets shouted from the rooftops with a worried audience.  One of the issues in the longevity of any coolant pump is the maintenance of the cooling system. The coolant needs to be changed regularly to maintain the required properties but often the coolant is left to become an acid to destroy many components in the system, not least the coolant pump impeller and seals.  

 

The long life coolant in the Continental is rated for 10 years or 100,000 miles (160,000 kilometers) before being replaced according to the Lincoln maintenance schedule.  I usually replace the coolant every 3 years  or earlier and plan to do the same  with the long life coolant. That is the best insurance against coolant pump failure for an owner.

 

It sounds like a few people are experiencing catastrophic failure with their leaking internal coolant pump but such is the way of engines, some fail, but most keep running. 


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#5 OFFLINE   1BlinkGone

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Posted 03 May 2017 - 02:31 AM

An internal coolant pump has been in production for a long time on many engines, Ford and GM and others. The failure rate is not high, but gets shouted from the rooftops with a worried audience.  One of the issues in the longevity of any coolant pump is the maintenance of the cooling system. The coolant needs to be changed regularly to maintain the required properties but often the coolant is left to become an acid to destroy many components in the system, not least the coolant pump impeller and seals.  

 

The long life coolant in the Continental is rated for 10 years or 100,000 miles (160,000 kilometers) before being replaced according to the Lincoln maintenance schedule.  I usually replace the coolant every 3 years  or earlier and plan to do the same  with the long life coolant. That is the best insurance against coolant pump failure for an owner.

 

It sounds like a few people are experiencing catastrophic failure with their leaking internal coolant pump but such is the way of engines, some fail, but most keep running. 

 

I've been out of the auto industry for over 20 years, so there have been some changes unfamiliar to me...but some things never change and with that, I am a BIG proponent of proper PrevMaint, including the cooling system. Too many people miss this, and suffer unnecessary damage later...generally due to neglect, as you point out. Thanks, Town. Hope people read your post and pay attention.


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